MadWand

MadWand has the best collection of free books online pdf, epub & kindle. All books 100% free for you to download and keep forever.

MadWand

MadWand has the best collection of free books online pdf, epub & kindle. All books 100% free for you to download and keep forever.

Book Magical Realism in West African Fiction

Download or read book Magical Realism in West African Fiction written by Brenda Cooper and published by Psychology Press. This book was released on 2004 with total page 250 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This study contextualizes magical realism within current debates and theories of postcoloniality and examines the fiction of three of its West African pioneers: Syl Cheney-Coker of Sierra Leone, Ben Okri of Nigeria and Kojo Laing of Ghana. Brenda Cooper explores the distinct elements of the genre in a West African context, and in relation to: * a range of global expressions of magical realism, from the work of Gabriel Garcia Marquez to that of Salman Rushdie * wider contemporary trends in African writing, with particular attention to how the realism of authors such as Chinua Achebe and Wole Soyinka has been connected with nationalist agendas. This is a fascinating and important work for all those working on African literature, magical realism, or postcoloniality.

Book Magical Realism in West African Fiction

Download or read book Magical Realism in West African Fiction written by Brenda Cooper and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2012-10-12 with total page 272 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This study contextualizes magical realism within current debates and theories of postcoloniality and examines the fiction of three of its West African pioneers: Syl Cheney-Coker of Sierra Leone, Ben Okri of Nigeria and Kojo Laing of Ghana. Brenda Cooper explores the distinct elements of the genre in a West African context, and in relation to: * a range of global expressions of magical realism, from the work of Gabriel Garcia Marquez to that of Salman Rushdie * wider contemporary trends in African writing, with particular attention to how the realism of authors such as Chinua Achebe and Wole Soyinka has been connected with nationalist agendas. This is a fascinating and important work for all those working on African literature, magical realism, or postcoloniality.

Book Magical Realism and Literature

Download or read book Magical Realism and Literature written by Christopher Warnes and published by Cambridge University Press. This book was released on 2020-11-12 with total page pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Magical realism can lay claim to being one of most recognizable genres of prose writing. It mingles the probable and improbable, the real and the fantastic, and it provided the late-twentieth century novel with an infusion of creative energy in Latin America, Africa, Asia, and beyond. Writers such as Alejo Carpentier, Gabriel García Márquez, Isabel Allende, Salman Rushdie, Ben Okri, and many others harnessed the resources of narrative realism to the representation of folklore, belief, and fantasy. This book sheds new light on magical realism, exploring in detail its global origins and development. It offers new perspectives of the history of the ideas behind this literary tradition, including magic, realism, otherness, primitivism, ethnography, indigeneity, and space and time.

Book Magical Realism and Cosmopolitanism

Download or read book Magical Realism and Cosmopolitanism written by K. Sasser and published by Springer. This book was released on 2014-09-02 with total page 260 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Magical Realism and Cosmopolitanism details a variety of functionalities of the mode of magical realism, focusing on its capacity to construct sociological representations of belonging. This usage is traced closely in the novels of Ben Okri, Salman Rushdie, Cristina García, and Helen Oyeyemi.

Book Fertile Crossings

Download or read book Fertile Crossings written by Pietro Deandrea and published by Rodopi. This book was released on 2002 with total page 318 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In retracing some of the routes followed by West African literature in English over the course of the last three decades, this book employs an original multidimensional approach whereby the three main genres - narrative, poetry and drama – are considered in the light of their intricate web of fecund rapport and mutual influence.Authors such as Tutuola, Armah, Aidoo and Awoonor translated the fluid structures of orality into written prose, and consequently infused their works with poetic and dramatic resonance, thereby challenging the canonical dominance of social realism and paving the way for the birth of West African magical realism in Laing, Okri and Cheney-Coker.Starting in the 1970s, poetry on stage has become a mainstream genre in Ghana, thanks to performances by Okai, Anyidoho and Acquah.Boundaries between literary theatre and other genres have undergone a similar dissolution in the affirmation of the concept of 'total art' from Efua Sutherland to ben Abdallah, Osofisan and others.Fertile Crossings offers a study of these topics from various viewpoints, blending in-depth textual analysis with reflections on the political import of the works in question within the context of the present state of African societies, all supported by interviews with most of the authors.

Book The Palgrave Handbook of Magical Realism in the Twenty First Century

Download or read book The Palgrave Handbook of Magical Realism in the Twenty First Century written by Richard Perez and published by Springer Nature. This book was released on 2020-04-30 with total page 650 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Palgrave Handbook of Magical Realism in the Twenty-First Century examines magical realism in literatures from around the globe. Featuring twenty-seven essays written by leading scholars, this anthology argues that literary expressions of magical realism proliferate globally in the twenty-first century due to travel and migrations, the shrinking of time and space, and the growing encroachment of human life on nature. In this global context, magical realism addresses twenty-first-century politics, aesthetics, identity, and social/national formations where contact between and within cultures has exponentially increased, altering how communities and nations imagine themselves. This text assembles a group of critics throughout the world—the Americas, Europe, Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and Australia—who employ multiple theoretical approaches to examine the different ways magical realism in literature has transitioned to a global practice; thus, signaling a new stage in the history and development of the genre.

Book Magical Realism and Deleuze

Download or read book Magical Realism and Deleuze written by Eva Aldea and published by A&C Black. This book was released on 2011-02-10 with total page 208 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: >

Book Ordinary Enchantments

Download or read book Ordinary Enchantments written by Wendy B. Faris and published by Vanderbilt University Press. This book was released on 2004 with total page 340 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Ordinary Enchantments investigates magical realism as the most important trend in contemporary international fiction, defines its characteristics and narrative techniques, and proposes a new theory to explain its significance. In the most comprehensive critical treatment of this literary mode to date, Wendy B. Faris discusses a rich array of examples from magical realist novels around the world, including the work not only of Latin American writers like Gabriel Garcia Marquez, but also of authors like Salman Rushdie, Gunter Grass, Toni Morrison, and Ben Okri. Faris argues that by combining realistic representation with fantastic elements so that the marvelous seems to grow organically out of the ordinary, magical realism destabilizes the dominant form of realism based on empirical definitions of reality, gives it visionary power, and thus constitutes what might be called a "remystification" of narrative in the West. Noting the radical narrative heterogeneity of magical realism, the author compares its cultural role to that of traditional shamanic performance, which joins the worlds of daily life and that of the spirits. Because of that capacity to bridge different worlds, magical realism has served as an effective decolonizing agent, providing the ground for marginal voices, submerged traditions, and emergent literatures to develop and create masterpieces. At the same time, this process is not limited to postcolonial situations but constitutes a global trend that replenishes realism from within. In addition to describing what many consider to be the progressive cultural work of magical realism, Faris also confronts the recent accusation that magical realism and its study as a global phenomenon can be seen as a form of commodification and an imposition of cultural homogeneity. And finally, drawing on the narrative innovations and cultural scenarios that magical realism enacts, she extends those principles toward issues of gender and the possibility of a female element within magical realism.

Book A Companion to Magical Realism

Download or read book A Companion to Magical Realism written by Stephen M. Hart and published by Boydell & Brewer. This book was released on 2005 with total page 306 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: "A refreshing new interdisciplinary slant on magical realism as an international literary phenomenon emerging from the trauma of colonial dispossession"--Provided by publisher.

Book Magical Realism in Postcolonial British Fiction

Download or read book Magical Realism in Postcolonial British Fiction written by Taner Can and published by Columbia University Press. This book was released on 2014-06-01 with total page 250 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This study aims at delineating the cultural work of magical realism as a dominant narrative mode in postcolonial British fiction through a detailed analysis of four magical realist novels: Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children (1981), Shashi Tharoor's The Great Indian Novel (1989), Ben Okri's The Famished Road (1991), and Syl Cheney-Coker's The Last Harmattan of Alusine Dunbar (1990). The main focus of attention lies on the ways in which the novelists in question have exploited the potentials of magical realism to represent their hybrid cultural and national identities. To provide the necessary historical context for the discussion, the author first traces the development of magical realism from its origins in European Painting to its appropriation into literature by European and Latin American writers and explores the contested definitions of magical realism and the critical questions surrounding them. He then proceeds to analyze the relationship between the paradigmatic turn that took place in postcolonial literatures in the 1980s and the concomitant rise of magical realism as the literary expression of Third World countries.

Book Magical Realism and the Postcolonial Novel

Download or read book Magical Realism and the Postcolonial Novel written by Christopher Warnes and published by Springer. This book was released on 2009-03-19 with total page 189 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book rethinks the origins and nature of magical realism and provides detailed readings of key novels by Asturias, Carpentier, García Márquez, Rushdie, and Okri. Identifying two different strands of the mode, one characterized by faith, the other by irreverence, Warnes makes available a new vocabulary for the discussion of magical realism.

Book Exploring Magic Realism in Salman Rushdie s Fiction

Download or read book Exploring Magic Realism in Salman Rushdie s Fiction written by Ursula Kluwick and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2013-02-28 with total page 250 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Kluwick breaks new ground in this book, moving away from Rushdie studies that focus on his status as postcolonial or postmodern, and instead considering the significance of magic realism in his fiction. Rushdie’s magic realism, in fact, lies at the heart of his engagement with the post/colonial. In a departure from conventional descriptions of magic realism—based primarily on the Latin-American tradition—Kluwick here proposes an alternative definition, allowing for a more accurate description of the form. She argues that it is disharmony, rather than harmony, that is decisive: that the incompatibility of the realist and the supernatural needs to be recognized as a driving force in Rushdie’s fiction. In its rigorous analysis of this Rushdian magic realism, this book considers the entire corpus—Midnight’s Children, Shame, The Satanic Verses, The Moor’s Last Sigh, The Ground Beneath Her Feet, Shalimar the Clown, and The Enchantress of Florence. This study is the first of its kind to do so.

Book Magic Realism in Holocaust Literature

Download or read book Magic Realism in Holocaust Literature written by J. Adams and published by Springer. This book was released on 2011-10-03 with total page 206 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A major contribution to Holocaust studies, the book examines the capacity of supernatural elements to dramatize the ethical and representational difficulties of Holocaust fiction. Exploring texts by such writers as D.M. Thomas and Markus Zusak it will appeal to scholars and students of Holocaust literature, magic realism, and contemporary fiction.

Book Traumatic Experience and Repressed Memory in Magical Realist Novels

Download or read book Traumatic Experience and Repressed Memory in Magical Realist Novels written by Md Abu Shahid Abdullah and published by Cambridge Scholars Publishing. This book was released on 2020-03-02 with total page 158 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book explores the close association between the literary representation of historical trauma and the alternative narrative form of magical realism, underscoring the role of memory, empathy and imagination. It discusses the potential of magical realism to give a literary representation to individual and collective trauma arising from the Holocaust, slavery, and apartheid, and to turn those unspoken memories into narratives. It also analyses the role of magical realism in depicting trauma suffered by female victims during and following those events. Again, by dealing with the above-mentioned events, their specific historical context and universal meaning for humankind, this book highlights a universal experience of trauma.

Book Patriarchy and Power in Magical Realism

Download or read book Patriarchy and Power in Magical Realism written by Maryam Ebadi Asayesh and published by Cambridge Scholars Publishing. This book was released on 2017-08-21 with total page 198 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Although the term magic(al) realism appeared in 1925 in pictorial art in Germany, it became well-known with the boom of magical realist fiction in Latin America in the 1960s. Since the 1980s, it has become one of the popular modes of writing worldwide. Due to its oxymoronic and hybrid nature, it has caught the attention of critics. Some have called it a postcolonial form of writing because of its prominence in postcolonial countries, while others have called it a postmodern mode because of the time of its emergence and the techniques applied in these kinds of novels. This book discusses how magical realism was used in the works of three contemporary female writers, Indigo or, Mapping the Waters (1992) by the British Marina Warner, The House of the Spirits (1982) by the Latin American writer Isabel Allende, and Fatma: a novel of Arabia (2002) by the Saudi Arabian Raja Alem. It shows how, by applying magical realism, these writers empowered women. Using revisionary nostalgia, these works changed the process of history writing by the powerful, showed the presence of women, and gave voice to their unheard stories. Even the techniques applied in these novels presented the clash with patriarchy and power.

Book Lies that Tell the Truth

Download or read book Lies that Tell the Truth written by Anne C. Hegerfeldt and published by Rodopi. This book was released on 2005 with total page 383 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Magic realism has long been treated as a phenomenon restricted to postcolonial literature. Drawing on works from Britain, Lies that Tell the Truth compellingly shows how magic realist fiction can be produced also at what is usually considered to be the cultural centre without forfeiting the mode's postcolonial attitude and aims. A close analysis of works by Angela Carter, Salman Rushdie, Jeanette Winterson, Robert Nye and others reveals how the techniques of magic realism generate a complex critique of the West's rational-empirical worldview from within a Western context itself. Understanding magic realism as a fictional analogue of anthropology and sociology, Lies that Tell the Truth reads the mode as a frequently humorous but at the same time critical investigation into people's attempts to make sense of their world. By laying bare the manifold strategies employed to make meaning, magic realist fiction indicates that knowledge and reality cannot be reduced to hard facts, but that people's dreams and fears, ideas, stories and beliefs must equally be taken into account.

Book The Columbia Guide to West African Literature in English Since 1945

Download or read book The Columbia Guide to West African Literature in English Since 1945 written by Oyekan Owomoyela and published by Columbia University Press. This book was released on 2008-10-21 with total page 228 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Composed by a premier scholar of African literature, this volume is a comprehensive guide to the literary traditions of Gambia, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Ghana, and Nigeria, five distinct countries bound by their experience with colonialism. Oyekan Owomoyela begins with an overview of the authors, texts, and historical events that have shaped the development of postwar Anglophone literatures in this region, exploring shifts in theme and the role of foreign sponsorship and illuminating recent debates regarding the language, identity, gender, and social commitments of various authors and their works. His introduction concludes with a bibliography of key critical texts. The second half of the volume is an alphabetical tour of writers, publications, concepts, genres, movements, and institutions, with suggested readings for further research. Entries focus primarily on fiction but also touch on drama and poetry. Featured authors include Chris Abani, Chinua Achebe, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Cyprian Ekwensi, Uzodinma Chukuka Iweala, Helen Oyeyemi, and Wole Soyinka. Topics range from the European origins of African literature and the West African diaspora to the development of an "African personality," the establishment of a regional publishing industry, and the global literary marketplace. Owomoyela also discusses such influences as the postwar emergence of Onitsha Market Literature, the Mbari Club, and the importance of the Noma Award. Owomoyela's portrait points to the major impact of West African literature on the evolution of both African and world literatures in English. Sure to become the definitive text for research in the field, The Columbia Guide to West African Literature in English Since 1945 is a vital resource for newcomers as well as for advanced scholars seeking a deeper understanding of the region's rich literary heritage.